What Are Some Examples Of Transitional Words In This Essay

Two sentences become a sentence, using transitions words or phrases that link sentences and paragraphs together smoothly so that there are no abrupt jumps or breaks between ideas. Here is a list of some common transition word that can be helpful for writer to use the word to link two sentences.

Click on the links below to take you to sample transition words and sample sentences

NOTE: the words that show transition are bold.

Words that ADD information:

Words that ADD informationalsoandanotherbesidefirst, second, third,...furthermorein additionmoreover

  • The little girl put on her yellow shirt and brown overalls.

  • Chris is on the basketball team this semester at Indiana School for the Deaf. In addition, he is on the soccer team.

  • We will be here for one more week so we can finish up our work. Another reason we are staying longer is because we do not want to miss the Deaf Way conference.

  • First of all, pour a half-cup of milk in the bowl; second, add two eggs; and third, stir the mixture.

  • I admire I. King Jordan because he is the first deaf president of Gallaudet. Besides that, I admire him because he is a great long distance runner. Furthermore, he is a dedicated family man. All in all, there is not much to dislike about the man, except he is too perfect!

  • Crystal likes camping in the mountains. Also, Crystal is an experienced hiker.

  • Texas School for the Deaf is perfectly located. Moreover, it has a strong academic program. For example, the school has a preschool program where both deaf and hearing children learn together.

Words that show CONCLUSION:

Words that show CONCLUSIONfinallyin conclusionto concludeto sum up

  • There were a lot of problems discussed at the meeting. Finally, after a few hours, we were able to prioritize the problems in the order we wanted to solve the problems.

  • Many parents and students have been complaining about the program. For example, scores on the end-of-grade tests have gone down from last year; teachers are not very motivated; and everyone is frustrated. To sum up, some improvements in the middle school program need to be made.

  • To conclude, I want to wish you all a very happy holiday season.

  • There was a malfunction in the smoke machines and lights, the curtains would not open and close properly, and one of the actors was sick with no stand-in. In conclusion, the play was a disaster.

 

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Words that REPEAT information

Words that REPEAT informationin factin other wordsonce againto put it another wayto repeat

  • That area is very dangerous for you to bike in. To repeat, I warn you not to go there.

  • Lisa decided not to go to King Islands. In fact she told me, "No, way."

  • I feel that our last Student Council meeting did not go well. In other words, it was a fine mess.

  • Sally has lost an oar on her boat and she is in big trouble. To put it another way, Sally has to find a different method of rowing or she will sink!

Words that show COMPARISON:

Words that show COMPARISONas ... asin like manneras iflikeby comparisonlikewisein comparisonsimilarly

  • At St. Rita School for the Deaf, a private school, there is a dress code that mandates how the students are to dress. The boys must wear a pair of pants and dress shirts. Similarly, the strict dress code requires plaid skirts and blouses for the girls.

  • Like her grandmother, Sally loves the Gallaudet Homecoming football game.

  • The news reported that Montana would be very cold this week. I said, "Likewise, Rochester will be, too."

  • Ronda bought a new Saturn car; so in like manner the rest of her friends did the same thing.

  • By comparison, Greensboro, N.C. is much smaller than Washington, D.C. is.

  • The cat acts as if he is the boss of the house.

  • The cat is as proud as a king.

  • Bob loves to go to parties. In comparison, Sue loves to stay at home with her family.

  • Compared to seven years ago when the printer worked well, it has been "ill" a great deal of the time in recent weeks.

 

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Words that show CONTRASTS or DIFFERENCES:

Words that show CONTRASTS or DIFFERENCESalthoughbuthoweverin contrastin spite ofneverthelessnonethelessrather thanthoughunlikeyet

  • I am not able to go to the beach with you. Nevertheless, thanks for asking me.

  • Karen's cat, Salem is so unlike Midnight. Midnight likes to nap a lot and Salem likes to play a lot.

  • The idea of attending the play at Gallaudet is nice. However, the Theoretical Issues in Sign Language Research conference is scheduled at the same time.

  • He prefers to attend the play rather than attending the conference.

  • Though I eat green beans because they are healthy, I hate them.

  • Although Steven was extremely tired, he washed the dishes.

  • The play was great, nonetheless, I was sick of seeing it after the fourth time.

  • Amber, Sharon, and Megan went to Busch Gardens for the day. In spite of the cold weather, they enjoyed themselves.

  • Sharon and Megan enjoyed the Loch Ness Monster ride, but Amber thought that Alpengist was faster and had more twists.

  • Sharon has not visited the Land of the Dragons, yet if she had had a kid, she would have gone by now.

  • Alexander Graham Bell believed in oral education for deaf children. This is in contrast to Edward Miner Gallaudet who believed in using American Sign Language to educate deaf children.

Words that show a TIME relationship:

Words that show a TIME relationshipafter so much timeafter thatat firstbeforebeginning, endingeventuallyearliereven whenever sincefollowingfrom then onfrom, toin timelastlatermeanwhilenear, farnextnowoversoonstillthe next day, nightthenwhile

  • Stephen went to pick up Irene before he stopped by McDonald's for lunch.

  • Karen was out with her friend last night.

  • We need to wash our clothes, after that we can go to the Taste of D.C. festival.

  • I can't wait to watch "NYPD," it is coming on soon. You can watch the rerun later this week.

  • Finally, I will get to see Rick Schroder. He has not been acting much since he was a teenager.

  • The beginning of the movie was sadder than the ending.

  • After so much time waiting in the long line, the boys finally got their hamburgers.

  • The Van Gogh art exhibit was shown earlier this month in Washington, D.C.

  • Wait until tonight, then you will be able to see the full moon over Gallaudet's Chapel Hall.

  • The show is not over until the actors take their final bows at the end.

  • While Missy was driving to work, she saw a deer by the roadside. She slowed down to watch the deer for a short time, then continued on her way to work.

  • Even when Sally was able to, she did not bother to finish her ASL project.

  • Clerc met with Gallaudet to prepare for the Congressional meeting scheduled for the next day.

  • The next night was very dark and stormy. Of course, it was Halloween night!

  • "Next, please," the lady called when it was my turn to go up to the booth to have my paycheck cashed.

  • Bobby's broken ankle will heal in time for the Maryland Deaf Festival.

  • That house felt very creepy inside; meanwhile, it was sunny outside.

  • Eventually, Sally got tired of John calling her on the TTY all the time since she was not interested in him.

  • She was still asleep when I got back home from work.

  • Now, please get this truck fixed because I need it to get to school on time!

  • Schools for the deaf used Sign Language until the dreadful conference in Milan; from then on, most schools for the deaf employed the oral method.

  • Super Kmart is near Landmark Mall, but Ames is far away from the mall. So it would be easier to shop at Super Kmart.

  • It will take two hours to go from Point A to Point B. Can you figure out how many hours it is from Point A to Point C?

  • At first, I thought it was a dead animal. As I walked closer, I saw it was only a worn-out coat on the ground.

  • Looking beyond this month, I predict that funding will be much better for this program.

  • Everyone hid out in the hall during the hurricane, hoping they would be safe.

  • Rebecca has not eaten at Lone Star ever since she became sick from eating the food.

  • Following "Friends" and "Mad about You," "ER" will be shown. "ER" is supposed to have two Deaf actresses on the show tonight.

 

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Words that LIMIT or PREPARE for an example:

Words that LIMIT or PREPARE for an examplefor examplefor instanceto illustratesuch as

  • Not all birds eat berries. For example, vultures eat dead animals.

  • Jeff is an interesting person to know. To illustrate, he knows a lot about the history of the Deaf community in Ireland.

  • There are things that need to be done to improve the company. For instance, we can begin by organizing the files.

  • I have a few things to take care of such as paying bills, cleaning the house, and going to the post office.

Words that show CAUSE (explain why):

Words that show CAUSE (explain why)becausebecause ofcaused by

  • Midnight was not able to move around well because his hind legs were in casts. He broke them when he fell off the bookshelf.

  • Did you see the tragic accident on I-85 south? It was caused by a drunk driver.

  • Because it is raining today, the homecoming game and the food booths will be cancelled.

  • I was late to work because of the heavy traffic.

 

Words that show EFFECT/RESULT:

Words that show EFFECT/RESULTSas a resultconsequentlyfor this/that reasonthat is whythereforethus

  • It is raining today thus we are not going to the beach.

  • The weather is supposed to be drizzly and chilly today; as a result, the Deaf Festival will be cancelled.

  • I was too tired; therefore I decided not to go to the state fair last night.

  • In 1903, William E. Hoy, a deaf baseball player, caught a fly ball in the ninth inning in spite of heavy fog. Consequently, Los Angles won the pennant for that year.

  • Ricky worked all day, from 8am until 11pm. That is why he stayed home instead of going camping with us.

  • The school bus broke down last week and has not been repaired yet. So for that reason, our dance group is unable to go to Washington, D.C. to perform at Kennedy Center.

 

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Words that ASSERT OBVIOUS TRUTH or GRANT OPPOSITION:

Words that ASSERT OBVIOUS TRUTH or GRANT OPPOSITIONcertainlyconceding thatgranted thatin factnaturallyno doubtof courseundoubtedlywithout a doubt

  • There is no doubt that the dog buried the bone in the garden.

  • Jeff told us an undoubtedly true story that was very scary.

  • The judge, without a doubt, thinks capital punishment is wrong.

  • Of course, Sarah is going to the beach this weekend with her parents. She needs a break from Gallaudet.

  • Naturally Steven is not going to agree with that plan. In fact, he thinks that the idea of setting up a business selling scarves on K Street would surely fail.

  • Certainly, you may borrow my book on the history of the American Deaf Community. But, be sure to return it to me next week.

  • Granted that Bob promised to send some money to help with the bills, yet this doesn't mean that he will.

  • Conceding that Sally is a strong skater, Rachel still believes she will be able to beat her in the Olympics. Rachel wants to become the first deaf ice skater to receive a gold medal.

 

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As a "part of speech" transition words are used to link words, phrases or sentences. They help the reader to progress from one idea (expressed by the author) to the next idea. Thus, they help to build up coherent relationships within the text.

Transitional Words

This structured list of commonly used English transition words — approximately 200, can be considered as quasi complete. It can be used (by students and teachers alike) to find the right expression. English transition words are essential, since they not only connect ideas, but also can introduce a certain shift, contrast or opposition, emphasis or agreement, purpose, result or conclusion, etc. in the line of argument.
The transition words and phrases have been assigned only once to somewhat artificial categories, although some words belong to more than one category.

There is some overlapping with prepositions and postpositions, but for the purpose of usage and completeness of this concise guide, I did not differentiate.

Agreement / Addition / Similarity

The transition words like also, in addition, and, likewise, add information, reinforce ideas, and express agreement with preceding material.

 

in the first place

not only ... but also

as a matter of fact

in like manner

in addition

coupled with

in the same fashion / way

first, second, third

in the light of

not to mention

to say nothing of

equally important

by the same token

again

to

and

also

then

equally

identically

uniquely

like

as

too

moreover

as well as

together with

of course

likewise

comparatively

correspondingly

similarly

furthermore

additionally

 

 

Opposition / Limitation / Contradiction

Transition phrases like but, rather and or, express that there is evidence to the contrary or point out alternatives, and thus introduce a change the line of reasoning (contrast).

 

although this may be true

in contrast

different from

of course ..., but

on the other hand

on the contrary

at the same time

in spite of

even so / though

be that as it may

then again

above all

in reality

after all

but

(and) still

unlike

or

(and) yet

while

albeit

besides

as much as

even though

although

instead

whereas

despite

conversely

otherwise

however

rather

nevertheless

nonetheless

regardless

notwithstanding

 

 

Cause / Condition / Purpose

These transitional phrases present specific conditions or intentions.

 

in the event that

granted (that)

as / so long as

on (the) condition (that)

for the purpose of

with this intention

with this in mind

in the hope that

to the end that

for fear that

in order to

seeing / being that

in view of

If

... then

unless

 

when

whenever

while

 

because of

as

since

while

lest

in case

provided that

given that

only / even if

so that

so as to

owing to

inasmuch as

due to

 

Examples / Support / Emphasis

These transitional devices (like especially) are used to introduce examples as support, to indicate importance or as an illustration so that an idea is cued to the reader.

 

in other words

to put it differently

for one thing

as an illustration

in this case

for this reason

to put it another way

that is to say

with attention to

by all means

 

 

 

important to realize

another key point

first thing to remember

most compelling evidence

must be remembered

point often overlooked

to point out

on the positive side

on the negative side

with this in mind

notably

including

like

to be sure

namely

chiefly

truly

indeed

certainly

surely

markedly

such as

 

especially

explicitly

specifically

expressly

surprisingly

frequently

significantly

particularly

in fact

in general

in particular

in detail

for example

for instance

to demonstrate

to emphasize

to repeat

to clarify

to explain

to enumerate

 

 

Effect / Consequence / Result

Some of these transition words (thus, then, accordingly, consequently, therefore, henceforth) are time words that are used to show that after a particular time there was a consequence or an effect.

Note that for and because are placed before the cause/reason. The other devices are placed before the consequences or effects.

 

as a result

under those circumstances

in that case

for this reason

in effect

for

thus

because the

then

hence

consequently

therefore

thereupon

forthwith

accordingly

henceforth

 

 

Conclusion / Summary / Restatement

These transition words and phrases conclude, summarize and / or restate ideas, or indicate a final general statement. Also some words (like therefore) from the Effect / Consequence category can be used to summarize.

 

as can be seen

generally speaking

in the final analysis

all things considered

as shown above

in the long run

given these points

as has been noted

in a word

for the most part

after all

in fact

in summary

in conclusion

in short

in brief

in essence

to summarize

on balance

altogether

overall

ordinarily

usually

by and large

to sum up

on the whole

in any event

in either case

all in all

 

Obviously

Ultimately

Definitely

 

Time / Chronology / Sequence

These transitional words (like finally) have the function of limiting, restricting, and defining time. They can be used either alone or as part of adverbial expressions.

 

at the present time

from time to time

sooner or later

at the same time

up to the present time

to begin with

in due time

as soon as

as long as

in the meantime

in a moment

without delay

in the first place

all of a sudden

at this instant

first, second

 

immediately

quickly

finally

after

later

last

until

till

since

then

before

hence

since

when

once

about

next

now

 

 

formerly

suddenly

shortly

henceforth

whenever

eventually

meanwhile

further

during

in time

prior to

forthwith

straightaway

 

by the time

whenever

 

until now

now that

 

instantly

presently

occasionally

 

 

Many transition words in the time category (consequently; first, second, third; further; hence; henceforth; since; then, when; and whenever) have other uses.

Except for the numbers (first, second, third) and further they add a meaning of time in expressing conditions, qualifications, or reasons. The numbers are also used to add information or list examples. Further is also used to indicate added space as well as added time.

 

Space / Location / Place

These transition words are often used as part of adverbial expressions and have the function to restrict, limit or qualify space. Quite a few of these are also found in the Time category and can be used to describe spatial order or spatial reference.

 

in the middle

to the left/right

in front of

on this side

in the distance

here and there

in the foreground

in the background

in the center of

 

adjacent to

opposite to 

here

there

next

where

from

over

near

above

below

down

up

under

further

beyond

nearby

wherever

around

between

before

alongside

amid

among

beneath

beside

behind

across

 


 

List of Transition Words

Transition Words are also sometimes called (or put in the category of) Connecting Words. Please feel free to download them via this link to the category page:
Linking Words & Connecting Words as a PDF.

It contains all the transition words listed on this site. The image to the left gives you an impression how it looks like.

 

 

Usage of Transition Words in Essays

Transition words and phrases are vital devices for essays, papers or other literary compositions. They improve the connections and transitions between sentences and paragraphs. They thus give the text a logical organization and structure (see also: a List of Synonyms).

All English transition words and phrases (sometimes also called 'conjunctive adverbs') do the same work as coordinating conjunctions: they connect two words, phrases or clauses together and thus the text is easier to read and the coherence is improved.


Usage: transition words are used with a special rule for punctuation: a semicolon or a period is used after the first 'sentence', and a comma is almost always used to set off the transition word from the second 'sentence'.

Example 1:
People use 43 muscles when they frown; however, they use only 28 muscles when they smile.

 

Example 2:
However, transition words can also be placed at the beginning of a new paragraph or sentence - not only to indicate a step forward in the reasoning, but also to relate the new material to the preceding thoughts.

Use a semicolon to connect sentences, only if the group of words on either side of the semicolon is a complete sentence each (both must have a subject and a verb, and could thus stand alone as a complete thought).

 

 


 

Further helpful readings about expressions, writing and grammar: Compilation of Writing Tips How to write good   ¦   Correct Spelling Study by an English University

 


 

Are you using WORD for writing professional texts and essays? There are many easy Windows Shortcuts available which work (almost) system-wide (e.g. in every programm you use).

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