Open Cover Letter Internship With No Experience

Cover letter for internship

Writing a cover letter to help you land a great internship? Here's an example of a pitch that hits all the right notes.

Use these cover letter tips to get an internship.

Writing a cover letter to get an internship can be intimidating. By using well-chosen words, you can make a good impression. While your letter needs to be customized to individual circumstances, this sample cover letter below can help an aspiring intern's cause.    

For additional writing tips, join Monster today, so the experts at Monster's Resume Writing Service can help you impress employers with a high-impact resume and cover letter for an internship.



Pamela Jung
451 Highland Ave. #45 | Sometown, TX 75000 | (555) 555-5555
pamela@somedomain.com


 


Jan. 5, 2017

Mr. James Crowley
Finance Manager
Acme Inc.
555 W. Applegarth Blvd.
Anytown, TX 75000

Dear Mr. Crowley:

Two of your former interns, Brian Hodges and Martha Smith, suggested I contact you regarding finance internship opportunities. They are familiar with my background and felt I would be an excellent match for your summer internship program.

Currently a junior majoring in finance at UNT, I have demonstrated strong academic performance in all finance courses, maintaining a 3.5 GPA in my major. The courses I have completed have given me a solid foundation in the tools, processes and methodologies involved in the successful analysis and management of portfolio-investment strategies. I have a proven ability to learn challenging concepts quickly and have developed competencies in diverse areas, including:

 

 

  • Industry research/information sourcing
  • Comparative analysis
  • Quantitative analysis
  • Pro forma analysis
  • Cash-flow analysis
  • Financial modeling and asset valuation
  • Portfolio and asset management
  • Insurance plans and mutual funds
  • Retirement and estate planning
  • Tax planning and investment strategies

In addition to my analytical strengths, I bring to the table advanced computer skills (with cross-platform exerptise in Windows and Mac); expertise in the MS Office suite of products; and familiarity with programming languages including SQL, HTML and VB.

Since starting college, I have worked part-time (summers/holidays/evenings) as a clerk at Wal-Mart. In this position, I have earned a reputation for consistently exceeding company and customer expectations. Wal-Mart's store manager has asked me to return this summer, but I yearn to gain corporate finance experience. I am impressed by Acme's innovation and success, and I would very much like to be part of such a winning company.

The enclosed resume provides more details of my skills and achievement track record. If you agree that I would make a valuable addition to your team, please feel free to call me at (555) 555-5555 or email me at pamela@somedomain.com. I know you are busy, so thank you for your time, and I look forward to speaking with you.

Sincerely,



Pamela Jung

Enclosure: Resume

 

 


Crafting an articulate cover letter is challenging for all job seekers. But if you have little or no work experience, the stakes are higher. It’s more challenging to prove your value when you don’t have a series of professional accomplishments to back up your assertions.

On the bright side, you probably have more to offer an employer than you realize. You just have to package your strengths in an appealing and sensible way. Let’s explore cover letter writing to understand its purpose, structure, and how you can leverage your experiences to date to prove that you’re the best candidate.

How To Write A Cover Letter With No Experience, Step-By-Step:

Why Write Cover Letters Anyway?

The purpose of a cover letter is to complement your resume. You may refer to your resume when writing a cover letter for a job application, but you must expand upon points made in the resume when writing the cover letter. The cover letter should breathe life into the points made in the resume, and create a compelling—or even emotional—narrative around your career hopes and aspirations. It’s your chance to tell your story and show that you have the passion and the drive to come into a job and make a difference.

Step 1: Contact Information

When beginning a cover letter for a job application, start with your contact details in the top left-hand corner of the page. Include your name, city of residence, phone number, and email address. (To preserve your privacy, do not include your physical address). You should also include your LinkedIn URL. Next, write the name of the company you’re applying to, and its city of residence.

Step 2: Salutation

Ideally, you address your reader by name in your salutation. Internet sleuthing may reveal the name of the hiring manager. If you can’t find a name, you have two options: call the organization and ask to learn more about the position, or write “Dear [Company Name]” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Step 3: Introduction

Use this section of your cover letter to introduce yourself and share your enthusiasm for the position. Start with your name and provide some background on your strengths. Always identify the position you’re seeking and how you learned about it. If someone at the company told you about the job, then mention that person’s name (only after asking their permission, though). Aim for one to two sentences in your Introduction—keep it short, sweet, and precise.

Example Cover Letter Introduction:“Hello, my name is Grace Addington, and I’m a goals- and details-oriented civil engineering graduate from Petaluma College. I was excited to learn about the Junior Engineer internship at Bay Area Rapid Transportation through my former classmate Katie Heinz.”

Step 4: Body Paragraphs

Here comes the most critical part of writing a cover letter with no experience. The purpose of your body paragraphs (one to two brief paragraphs, tops) is to prove that you’re the best candidate for the position. Seeing as how you have little or no previous professional work experience to fall back on, you’ll want to place emphasis on soft skills—attributes of a personal nature that say a lot about your work ethic and ability to work in sync with others.

Now your resume likely consists of part-time jobs or school activities or memberships in school associations that maybe aren’t 100% related to the job you’re going after. Look closer, though—you’ve probably garnered skills in these experiences that can carry over to the job you’re applying for. Below are two examples of cover letter body paragraphs that hone in on two key phrases noted in a job advertisement as requirements: “strong interpersonal skills” and “positive work ethic.” You should be able to figure out pretty quickly which example hits the mark.

Example 1:“I am Twig & Twine’s ideal office manager. As my resume states, I served as an RA at my dorm. I know how to manage an array of things.”

Example 2: “You’re looking for a candidate with strong interpersonal skills and a positive work ethic. While serving as an RA at Porter College’s main dormitory, I planned monthly social events for over 200 students, settled two to five student disputes per-week, and mentored a select group of students in Composition. The experience taught me, rather quickly, how to efficiently multi-task, and how to effectively settle conflicts of all types in a calm, level-headed manner. I feel confident stating that I can bring these talents to Twig & Twine’s office manager position.”

The second example takes the duties that likely appeared in the RA position on the resume and then digs deep, illustrating how the tackling of those duties turned into accomplishments, and led the applicant to grow the crucial skills needed for the office manager position.

One last thing about body paragraphs—remember to frame your message around the employer’s needs, and not yours. Focus on what you can bring to the job, and how your talents will translate into success for the company. That’s important in any cover letter, and becomes even more crucial in a cover letter with no previous work experience.

Step 5: Closing

End your letter by reiterating why you’re the best candidate and express your interest once again in the position. Thank the reader for the time they took to review your application. To close, sign off formally. Try “Respectfully yours” or “Sincerely.”

Wait! There Are Two More Steps

First, proofread your document. Read it out loud to catch errors quickly. Ask a trustworthy person to read it as well. Open your mind to constructive feedback. Once the content is finalized, save as a PDF and title it “[Your Name] Cover Letter” to prevent confusion. Voila! You’re done.

About this guest author:

Since 2005, LiveCareer’s team of career coaches, certified resume writers, and savvy technologists have been developing career tools that have helped over 10 million users build stronger resumes, write persuasive cover letters, and develop better interview skills. Land the job you want faster using our free samples, templates, writing guides, and easy-to-use resume-builder software.

 

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